Vital Signs

Study Finds Youth Who Have Used E-Cigarettes are Almost Twice as Likely to Intend to Smoke Conventional Cigarettes

More than a quarter of a million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used electronic cigarettes in 2013, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research.

NSAIDs May Lower Breast Cancer Recurrence Rate in Overweight and Obese Women

Recurrence of hormone-related breast cancer was cut by half in overweight and obese women who regularly used aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), according to data published in Cancer Research

New Data Brief Reveals Characteristics of Uninsured Minority Men

A data brief released by the Office of Minority Health at the US Department of Health and Human Services during Men’s Health Month last June examined the characteristics of uninsured adult males by race and ethnicity, using the most recent data from the 2012 American Community Survey (ACS

Study Finds Premature Deaths from Five Leading Causes Due to Modifiable Risks

Each year, nearly 900,000 Americans die prematurely from the five leading causes of death—yet 20% to 40% of the deaths from each cause could be prevented, according to a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Longevity Gene May Boost Brain Power

Scientists showed that people who have a variant of a longevity gene, called KLOTHO, have improved brain skills such as thinking, learning, and memory, regardless of their age, sex, or whether they have a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.

Prevalence of Allergies the Same, Regardless of Where You Live

In the largest, most comprehensive, nationwide study to examine the prevalence of allergies from early childhood to old age, scientists from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) report that allergy prevalence is the same across different regions of the United States, except in children

Nurse Staffing and Education Linked to Reduced Patient Mortality

Hospitals in Europe where nursing staff care for fewer patients and have a higher proportion of bachelor’s degree-trained nurses had significantly fewer surgical patients die while hospitalized, according to a new study.

NAHN’s Muevete (Move) USA™ Project Makes an Impact Nationwide

There’s a movement that’s spreading across the nation, and it’s called “Muevete USA.” It’s a project that brings together nurses and nursing student volunteers, low-income Hispanic children, and community organizations to learn about the importance of healthy eating. 

Black Women Develop Lupus at Younger Age with More Life-Threatening Complications

There are substantial racial disparities in the burden of lupus, according to initial data from the largest and most far-reaching epidemiology study ever conducted on the disease lupus and published recently in the journal Arthritis and Rheumatism.

One Dose of HPV Vaccine May Be Enough to Prevent Cervical Cancer

Women vaccinated with one dose of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine had antibodies against the viruses that remained stable in their blood for four years, suggesting that a single dose of vaccine may be sufficient to generate long-term immune responses and protection against new HPV in

Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates Remain Low

About one in three adults aged 50 to 75 years have not been tested for colorectal cancer as recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Women’s Height Linked to Cancer Risk

The taller a postmenopausal woman is, the greater her risk for developing cancer, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention

Healthy Life Expectancies at Age 65 Highest in Hawaii, Lowest in Mississippi

Residents of the South regardless of race, and blacks throughout the United States, have lower healthy life expectancy at age 65, according to a recent report in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Women Smokers May Have Greater Risk for Colon Cancer

Smoking increased the risk for developing colon cancer, and female smokers may have a greater risk than male smokers, according to data published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Study Suggests Only Half of Americans with Hepatitis C Receive Complete Testing for the Virus

Only half of Americans identified as ever having had hepatitis C received follow-up testing showing that they were still infected, according to a recent report issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Hospitals Report Reductions in Some Types of Health Care-Associated Infections

Hospitals in the United States continue to make progress in the fight against central line-associated bloodstream infections and some surgical site infections, according to a recent report issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Catheter-associated urinary tract infections

National Survey Shows Hispanic Mothers Want Support for their Infant Feeding Choices

Hispanic mothers want to continue making their own infant feeding decisions and they want unrestricted access to infant feeding information, according to a recent national survey.

Male Nurses Becoming More Commonplace

The nursing profession remains overwhelmingly female, but the representation of men has increased as the demand for nurses has grown over the last several decades, according to a recent US Census Bureau study.

Congratulations to Minority Nurse’s 2008 Scholarship Winners!

Ms. Jessy Johnson

We are pleased to announce the winners of the 9th Annual Minority Nurse Magazine Scholarship Program awards. Ms. Mary Jo Coll, a nursing student at Drexel University, and Ms.

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