Minority Health

"Race for Results" Report Addresses Health of Minority Children

A recent report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation shed light on something nurses see every day - there's a large gap in the well-being of minority children in the United States.

A Proactive Program

A Proactive Program

Teen pregnancy, once a declining problem, is once again on the rise, particularly in minority communities. To combat the trend, one Massachusetts nurse started a program aimed at educating students and parents about teen pregnancy before it occurs.

Understanding health disparities in Indiana

When discussing economic disparities, urban centers often come to mind, and rightfully so, as a greater concentration of people tends to yield more socioeconomic disparities.

Class on the water

Class on the water

During the 2011 National Nurses Week, a week the American Nurses Association honors every year from National Nurses Day, May 6, to Florence Nightingale's birthday, May 11, four nursing students were given the opportunity to travel to Sierra Leone to work on a field mission for Mercy Ships.

Lunchbox heroes: they don't want candy

As a partnership between the Healthy Schools Campaign, Chicago Public Schools, the Office of Minority Health, and the U.S.

Health Care Reform One Year Later

Health Care Reform One Year Later

President Obama signed the historic Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law on March 23, 2010, and its first changes went into effect on July 1 of the same year. But signing that bill was just the beginning of a passionate national health care debate.

When premies grow up

This month, researchers at the University of Rhode Island’s College of Nursing will present their latest findings from a 23-year-long study of premature infants, the longest running study of its kind in the United States, at the Congress of the European Group of Pediatric Work Physiology at the U

Sickle cell, silent strokes, and galvanizing nurses

Sickle cell, silent strokes, and galvanizing nurses

Some children already suffering sickle cell disease may find themselves at risk for yet another malady: "silent strokes." Researchers found those children with a combination of sickle cell, high blood pressure, and the anemia inherent with sickle cell were more vulnerable to this dangerous, sympt

African American patients exhibit higher COPD readmission rates

When patients leave a health care facility, everyone hopes it will be for the last time, as they go on to lead a healthy life. But for some African Americans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), their return visits might necessitate a revolving door.

Mobility limitations in African Americans linked to depressive symptoms

Mobility limitations in African Americans linked to depressive symptoms

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has led a study displaying a relation between demographic health issues and mobility limitation. Researchers found that depressed African American women had almost three times the odds of mobility limitations than those who are not depressed.

World AIDS Day: Getting to Zero

World AIDS Day: Getting to Zero

On December 1 each year, you will find countries around the world commemorating World AIDS Day to raise awareness of the spreading of HIV infection. Each year, a theme is chosen for the campaign by UNAIDS.

Health care workers at risk

Health care workers at risk

According to a recent study done by the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, researchers are now doing their best to implement safety measures for nurses when administering toxic drugs, such as chemotherapy.

Study finds black youth in California targeted by tobacco marketing

Academic researchers, funded by California's Tobacco Related Disease Research Program, found a greater number of menthol cigarette advertising at retailers near high schools with a high African American student population.

Spike in maternal opiate use, infant withdrawal

Researchers at the University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, and the University of Pittsburgh found maternal opiate use had increased nearly five-fold between 2000–2009.

Study finds more hospital-related infection due to burned-out nurses

Study finds more hospital-related infection due to burned-out nurses

Two kinds of hospital-acquired infections—catheter-associated urinary tract infections and surgical site infections—have been on the rise, according to a new study.

Study shows minority women more likely to die during or soon after childbirth

Study shows minority women more likely to die during or soon after childbirth

A recent study hosted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that minority women in the United States are more likely to die during or soon after childbirth than white women.

California hospital ER overcrowding affects area minorities

A University of California, San Francisco study found that California hospitals in areas with large minority populations are more likely to be overcrowded and divert ambulances, delaying timely emergency care.

Click Here for Cultural Competence

Thanks to the new Culturally Competent Nursing Modules online training program, the skills nurses need to provide care to an increasingly diverse patient population have never been easier to learn--or to teach

More Minority Americans Opt for Plastic Surgery

More Americans are getting face lifts and other types of cosmetic surgery these days--and more of those faces being lifted are likely to be non-Caucasian than ever before

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