Diabetes

“Sugar” – A Preventable Disease with Devastating Consequences

As a child, more than four decades ago, I once heard older relatives talking about their health troubles related to diabetes, which they often simply called “sugar.” This sounded more to me like a tasty treat than a disease.

Beating Diabetes

Beating Diabetes

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) released new data regarding the mortality rate for those living with Type 1 Diabetes.

A foundation for future growth

A foundation for future growth

In an effort to combat the major health issues plaguing American Indians, the University of Kansas Medical Center and the American Indian Health Research and Education Alliance announced plans to create a Center for American Indian Community Health.

Mobility limitations in African Americans linked to depressive symptoms

Mobility limitations in African Americans linked to depressive symptoms

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has led a study displaying a relation between demographic health issues and mobility limitation. Researchers found that depressed African American women had almost three times the odds of mobility limitations than those who are not depressed.

New autism research links maternal obesity to diagnosis

About one in 88 children are diagnosed with autism, but it is possible that 10% of affected children will outgrow their diagnosis by the time they are teenagers. April was National Autism Awareness Month, which put a start on new research regarding the causes of the disorder.

Researchers Identify Gene for Type 2 Diabetes in Mexican Americans

The recent discovery of the major susceptibility gene for type 2 diabetes in Mexican Americans—10.6% of whom are inflicted with the disease—is being hailed as a major accomplishment. This finding, previously considered a genetic impossibility, will ultimately result in medical advancement for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

American Diabetes Association Supports Increase in Indian Health Service Funding

Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions among Native Americans, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Over 12% of all Indian populations in the United States suffer from type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. The Pima Indians in Arizona have the highest rate of diabetes in the world—about half of adults between the ages of 30 and 64 are diagnosed with the disease.

“Clair Huxtable” Helps Raise Awareness of the Link Between Heart Disease and Diabetes

Former President Bill Clinton's initiative to eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in health categorizes cardiovascular disease and diabetes as two separate health issues. Yet the connection between these two conditions is so strong that it is virtually impossible to tackle one without also addressing the other.

D is for Diabetes--and Disparities

Diabetes is the focus of another recently released major study on the health status of women in the United States.

UAB Receives Grant to Study Diabetes Self-Care Among Black, Caucasian Teens

The National Institute of Nursing Research has given the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) a four-year, $1.3 million grant to study how parents should encourage responsible self-care in adolescents with chronic illnesses such as diabetes.

UAB Receives Grant to Study Diabetes Self-Care Among Black, Caucasian Teens

The National Institute of Nursing Research has given the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) a four-year, $1.3 million grant to study how parents should encourage responsible self-care in adolescents with chronic illnesses such as diabetes.

New “Two-in-One” Diabetes Drug Works Twice as Hard

“It Takes Two” is the title of a song that was a big hit for the dynamic duo of Marvin Gaye and Tammy Terrell back in the Sixties. It’s also the concept behind an exciting new advance in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, a disease that has reached epidemic proportions in the U.S.

Resources Roundup 2008

Resources Roundup 2008

One of the biggest benefits of attending minority nursing association conferences—in addition to all the networking opportunities, educational programming, CEUs and camaraderie, of course—is getting to visit exhibits filled with booth after booth offering free or low-cost minority health resources that you can take home and start using in your practice right away.

Hispanic Health Information Is Just a Phone Call Away

Hispanics continue to face substantial health disparities, including underinsurance, a lack of linguistically and culturally competent health care providers, and disproportionately high rates of serious chronic diseases such as asthma, diabetes, cancer and HIV/AIDS.

Diabetes Digest

Diabetes Digest

8 Diabetes News Briefs that Nurses Need to Know About

Comic Strip Helps Raise Diabetes Awareness in the Hispanic Community

Comic Strip Helps Raise Diabetes Awareness in the Hispanic Community

To help spread the word about this serious health threat, Baldo co-creators Hector Cantú and Carlos Castellanos partnered with the National Alliance for Hispanic Health

Hispanics Get “A+” in Diabetes Awareness But “F” in Diabetes Action

A new survey sponsored by the American Heart Association contains good news and bad news for nurses who are working to eliminate diabetes health disparities in Hispanic communities.

Fighting Diabetes Disparities in Communities of Color

Fighting Diabetes Disparities in Communities of Color

From Indian reservations and U.S./Mexico border communities to major urban centers, minority nurses are finding that culturally competent interventions and community outreach are beginning to make a difference in closing the diabetes gap.

Multicultural Diabetes Prevention Campaign Offers Resources for Nurses

The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a federally funded program sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, recently created Small Steps, Big Rewards, billed as the first-ever national multicultural diabetes prevention campaign designed specifically to reach diverse populations that have the highest risk of developing the disease.

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