Cancer

One Dose of HPV Vaccine May Be Enough to Prevent Cervical Cancer

Women vaccinated with one dose of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine had antibodies against the viruses that remained stable in their blood for four years, suggesting that a single dose of vaccine may be sufficient to generate long-term immune responses and protection against new HPV in

Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates Remain Low

About one in three adults aged 50 to 75 years have not been tested for colorectal cancer as recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

An American Journey: From Constipation to Colorectal Cancer

In my work as a radiologist, every day I see a whole lot of poop, well, actually images of poop. One of the most common emergency room patient complaints is abdominal pain and, too often, particularly in children, the cause is simply constipation.

Women’s Height Linked to Cancer Risk

The taller a postmenopausal woman is, the greater her risk for developing cancer, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention

Genetic research gets a $6.5 million boost

Genetic research gets a $6.5 million boost

The funding underwrites research regarding the relationship between genetics and aggressive prostate cancer in African Americans, the connection between viruses and cervical cancer, and the role of genes in asthma and obesity among children.

A foundation for future growth

A foundation for future growth

In an effort to combat the major health issues plaguing American Indians, the University of Kansas Medical Center and the American Indian Health Research and Education Alliance announced plans to create a Center for American Indian Community Health.

Approaching cancer step-by-step

Researchers from the University of Michigan and Duke University seem to have found a preferable approach to discussing treatment options with cancer patients.

Caught by a nose

In the fight against cancer, so often the disease seems to be one-step ahead of researchers and health care providers. And anything that gives health professionals an advantage—advanced patient screenings, genetic indicators, etc.—is an important part of the battle.

Cancer rates higher for lesbian, gay, and bisexual community

A study by the Boston University School of Public Health has found a need to create health programs specifically promoting the well-being of lesbian, gay, and bisexual cancer survivors. The research was lead by Ulrike Boehmer, associate professor of community health sciences.

Minorities Most Likely to Have Aggressive Tumors, Less Likely to Get Radiation

Minorities Most Likely to Have Aggressive Tumor

Women with aggressive breast cancer were more likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy, but at the expense of completing locoregional radiation therapy, according to recently presented data.

New Co-Pay Assistance Program Helps Fight Blood Cancer Disparities

New Co-Pay Assistance Program Helps Fight Blood Cancer Disparities

Because blood cancer medicines are expensive, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society has launched a new program to help myeloma patients who are having trouble affording their prescriptions

Fighting Tobacco Disparities in the Gay Community

Fighting Tobacco Disparities in the Gay Community

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons are 50% to 200% more likely to smoke than the rest of the population, according to the National LGBT Tobacco Control Network.

The Power of a Pear

Using a culturally competent approach and an unusual teaching aid, a nurse educator in New Orleans is helping both African-American and Taiwanese women reduce their risk of developing cervical cancer.

Spreading the Word

A unique cancer education and early detection program helps nurses of color share life-saving prevention information with residents of at-risk minority communities--and each other.

Nurses, Culture and Cancer

Nurses, Culture and Cancer

Through culturally competent outreach, education, research and patient care, nurses can make a dramatic difference in reducing minority cancer disparities

Breast Cancer: Finding the Roots of Disparities

Breast Cancer: Finding the Roots of Disparities

Female breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among all races, yet mortality rates differ between ethnicities and early detection numbers falter among minorities. A challenging yet rewarding specialty, oncology nursing puts nurses against such inequalities.

African American Men and Prostate Cancer: The Need for Innovative Education

African American Men and Prostate Cancer: The Need for Innovative Education

Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed forms of cancer in the United States. When compared with Caucasian males, African American males are diagnosed much later and the mortality rate is 2.4 times higher. Part of the problem is a lack of knowledge in the African American community, but nurses can combat the disparities through creative outreach.

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