African American / Black nurses

Mobility limitations in African Americans linked to depressive symptoms

Mobility limitations in African Americans linked to depressive symptoms

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has led a study displaying a relation between demographic health issues and mobility limitation. Researchers found that depressed African American women had almost three times the odds of mobility limitations than those who are not depressed.

Congratulations, Minority Nurse Scholarship Winners!

First-Prize Winner, Shylisa Hicks

Another year, another record-breaking number of applicants, and another group of nurses and soon-to-be nurses that overwhelmed us with their determination, dedication, compassion, and intelligence. Choosing our scholarship winners has always been a difficult task, and this year was no exception.

African American Nurse-Midwives: Continuing the Legacy

African American Nurse-Midwives: Continuing the Legacy

The profession of midwifery in the African American community has a rich history dating back to the days of slavery. Four centuries later, black nurse-midwives continue to play an important role in improving health outcomes for at-risk women and newborns.

Leadership in Style

Rowena Elliott, or "Dr. E" as her students call her, at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Her drive, ambition, and determination have led Rowena Elliott to become the first African American president of the American Nephrology Nurses Association. The strength of her leadership qualities and character has made her a memorable nurse educator and role model for minority nursing students everywhere.

From Hate to Hope: A Nursing Journey

From Hate to Hope: A Nursing Journey

One nurse recounts her years in the field, climbing the professional ladder while watching the sociopolitical climate of the United States change around her—for better or worse.

NBNA 40th Anniversary Celebration

Debra A. Toney, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N.

It was 40 years ago—half a lifetime—that Dr. Lauranne Sams founded the National Black Nurses Association. Today, the NBNA represents 150,000 nurses, a resource for black nurses everywhere.

Balancing Baby: Returning to Work After Maternity Leave

Balancing Baby: Returning to Work After Maternity Leave

The most joyful and life-changing period of nurses' lives can often be stressful without a plan for balancing work and family life after maternity or paternity leave. Here is a review of some of the best practices to make sure this transition is as smooth and happy as possible.

Preserving the History of Black Nurses

Lawrence C. Washington

Howard University in Washington, D.C., has served a vital role in the education of African Americans, and its College of Medicine is notable in the history of African American physicians. Yet, it’s the University’s former partner in nursing education, the Freedmen’s Hospital School of Nursing, that graduated 1,700 of some of the first black nurses in the country. And it’s the Freedmen’s Hospital School of Nursing whose story is rarely told.

African-American Nurses Honored at “Color of Care” Awards Reception

Exemplary black nurses and organizations who have made significant contributions to the advancement of nursing in such areas as education and military service, philanthropy and health equity and civil rights and organizational development were recently honored...

Historically Black Nursing School Receives Over $1 Million to Address Nursing Shortage

By the year 2010, more than 40% of the nursing work force will be over the age of 50 and by the year 2020, the demand for nurses will exceed the supply by 20%, according to the Journal of the American Medical Association.

VITAS Honors National Black Nurses Association for Black History Month

What better way for a national health care organization to commemorate Black History Month than by honoring the historical contributions of African American nurses?

Looking for Black Nurses Leaders: A Call to Action

Looking for Black Nurses Leaders: A Call to Action

The nurses who authored Advancing the Dream through Faculty Diversity and this article, each reached out to Minority Nurse in search of a place to share their experiences as nurses, as African Americans. From different areas of the country and different professional backgrounds, never knowing one another, they both submitted abstracts that put forth the same beliefs and arguments, grounded in a desire to improve diversity in the workplace as a means to improve the quality of life in the black community.

Diamond Jubilee

Diamond Jubilee

Chi Eta Phi Sorority celebrates its 75th year of providing community service, fellowshipand professional support for minorities in nursing.

Celebrating Excellence: Past, Present and Future

Celebrating Excellence: Past, Present and Future

The National Black Nurses Association’s Institute of Excellence is more than just a showcase for the outstanding achievements of African American nursing leaders--it’s also helping to increase opportunities for future leadership development.

From “Small-Town Girl” to Pioneering Nurse Educator

From “Small-Town Girl” to Pioneering Nurse Educator

Dr. May L. Wykle, the first African American dean of Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, talks to Minority Nurse about how she overcame prejudice to pursue her nursing education and why she has made it her lifelong mission to bring more minority students into the profession.

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